Evidence of a Christmas spirit network in the brain

In a recent functional MRI study, Danish researchers, including NRU-affiliated Ulrich Lindberg, have found out where exactly in the human brain the Christmas spirit resides.

In the study, 10 individuals who celebrated Christmas and 10 who did no, were asked to fill out questionnaires on their feelings toward Christmas and then completed an MRI in which they were asked to look at different images, including Christmas-related imagery. Thereby the group of researchers were able to locate the source of the feelings of Christmas joy or disgust to a number of regions in the brain that may explain reactions to this festive time of year.

The small study has been published in the British Medical Journal's annual Christmas issue, where researchers use tongue-in-cheek scientific methods as a way to bring some humor into the scientific field. Link to the paper here.

A new study has localized the brain areas involved with "the Christmas spirit". The Christmas spirit has been a widespread phenomenon for centuries and is commonly described as feelings of joy and nostalgia mixed with associations to merry feelings, gifts, delightful smells, and good food. When it comes to Christmas spirit, we either embrace it - or give it a big "bah humbug". This holiday season, researchers are using an MRI to find out where exactly the Christmas spirit resides. Danish researchers have identified the parts the brain which light up when subjects see images associated with Christmas, as part of a project to help the millions who suffer "a Christmas spirit deficiency - or the "bah humbug" syndrome". We refer to this as the "bah humbug" syndrome. Sacred Heart http://sacredheartspectrum.com/2015/12/bah-humbug-syndrome-located-in-brain/
A new study has localized the brain areas involved with "the Christmas spirit". The Christmas spirit has been a widespread phenomenon for centuries and is commonly described as feelings of joy and nostalgia mixed with associations to merry feelings, gifts, delightful smells, and good food. When it comes to Christmas spirit, we either embrace it - or give it a big "bah humbug". This holiday season, researchers are using an MRI to find out where exactly the Christmas spirit resides. Danish researchers have identified the parts the brain which light up when subjects see images associated with Christmas, as part of a project to help the millions who suffer "a Christmas spirit deficiency - or the "bah humbug" syndrome". We refer to this as the "bah humbug" syndrome. Sacred Heart http://sacredheartspectrum.com/2015/12/bah-humbug-syndrome-located-in-brain/
A new study has localized the brain areas involved with "the Christmas spirit". The Christmas spirit has been a widespread phenomenon for centuries and is commonly described as feelings of joy and nostalgia mixed with associations to merry feelings, gifts, delightful smells, and good food. When it comes to Christmas spirit, we either embrace it - or give it a big "bah humbug". This holiday season, researchers are using an MRI to find out where exactly the Christmas spirit resides. Danish researchers have identified the parts the brain which light up when subjects see images associated with Christmas, as part of a project to help the millions who suffer "a Christmas spirit deficiency - or the "bah humbug" syndrome". We refer to this as the "bah humbug" syndrome. What the Danish researchers found is that whether we're the impersonation of the Grinch, the in-betweens or we get all hyped about Christmas, doctors can see it. With the help of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the Danish researchers took a look at brain activity related to the Christmas spirit and found some pretty interesting facts. 'Accurate localisation of the Christmas spirit is a paramount first step in being able to help this group of patients, ' they say. Sacred Heart http://sacredheartspectrum.com/2015/12/bah-humbug-syndrome-located-in-brain/
A new study has localized the brain areas involved with "the Christmas spirit". The Christmas spirit has been a widespread phenomenon for centuries and is commonly described as feelings of joy and nostalgia mixed with associations to merry feelings, gifts, delightful smells, and good food. When it comes to Christmas spirit, we either embrace it - or give it a big "bah humbug". This holiday season, researchers are using an MRI to find out where exactly the Christmas spirit resides. Danish researchers have identified the parts the brain which light up when subjects see images associated with Christmas, as part of a project to help the millions who suffer "a Christmas spirit deficiency - or the "bah humbug" syndrome". We refer to this as the "bah humbug" syndrome. Sacred Heart http://sacredheartspectrum.com/2015/12/bah-humbug-syndrome-located-in-brain/